J. Duryea House

 

The J. Duryea House appears on the 1840 map, but, according to Historian Howard Durie, the original house burned and was replaced by the one at 33 North Avenue. Judging by its appearance, the current structure is estimated to have been built on the original foundation in the mid-to-late 19th century, due to the second story wall dormers, 2/2 windows and louvered shutters.

The house is very long from east to west, and neither its roofline nor its south façade reflect alterations to the house's length.

The first story of the south façade (front) is five bays wide, and the second story is three bays wide. The entire front façade is adorned with 2/2 glazing framed with louvered shutters. The south façade is graced with a seven-bay veranda with post supports and arched spandrel trim. The veranda was probably constructed in the late-19th-to-early-20-century time period. There are also three second-story gable wall dormers with gable roofs and patterned shingles on the gables in the south façade.

There is a one-story addition with a catslide roof and 2/2 windows on the west side attached to the north end. All windows in the west façade are 2/2 with louvered shutters.

There are brick interior chimneys with corbelled caps at the east and west ends. Overhanging eaves appear at the east and west second story sides.

The approximately-fifty-acre property on which the J Duryea House is sited is almost entirely in New York State. However, the overwhelming majority of the house is located on the 1.23-acre portion of the property that is in Montvale.

This house is significant in the early settlement and agricultural/architectural history of Montvale.